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Mashpee Commons: The Shopping Hub of the Upper Cape

 

Mashpee Commons has evolved over the years as one of Cape Cod’s premier shopping destinations, with a wide variety of retail and food establishments. But there’s also a bustling energy, an inward attraction there, which has created jobs and municipal income in an area of Cape Cod that was previously lacking.

It’s a major shopping hub of the Upper Cape, with over 100 stores and restaurants and 52 apartments. By taking only a few steps, shoppers can pick up groceries, gifts and specialty goods, all before meeting up with a friend for cocktails.

Its town-center feel attracts those seeking a Sunday stroll, but also the busy business person in need of a trusty place to find a tie. Its old-school architecture is a sendoff to the type of community which houses it – one which pays homage to the past but eagerly seeks a steady economic future.

What’s in Mashpee Commons?

The types of businesses in Mashpee Commons are diverse and numerous, but we can break them down into the following categories.

Dining and Entertainment. There are nearly twenty options for noshing within the Commons, most of which are local businesses which offer selections for both worldly and home-stuck palates. Diners may choose between pub fare at Bobby Byrnes, French classics at Bleu, Italian fare at Estia or Siena, and sandwiches at Burrito Bistro or Panera. They can also pursue pizza at Zoe’s, smoothies at Organic Market, and a whole host of Asian options at Asia. After dinner, visitors can catch a flick at the Regal Cinemas just steps away.

Clothing. Shoppers have consistently flocked to Mashpee Commons for its wide array of clothing stores. There are over 30, offering the type of diversity you find in the development’s restaurants. Chico’s, Francesca’s, White House|Black Market and Modern Mix offer more contemporary styles and fits, while Puritan, Jos. A. Bank and Soft as a Grape are longtime local favorites. Selections from Vineyard Vines, Cape Kids, MOCEAN, Suits You Swimwear and The Black Dog will let you show off a little homegrown Cape Cod chic.

Specialty Shops. These are your gift shops, home furnishings and gourmet selections. Setting the Space and Williams Sonoma have your living room and kitchen covered. Massage Envy, Beyond Beauty and Polished Nails and Spa provide for various health and wellness needs, and the Spice Merchants, Cape Cod Art Bar, Color Me Mine, Kensington’s and Cape Kaleidoscopes prove that shoppers have no shortage of options available to them in the Commons. If you need any sort of healthy ingredient, be it gluten free, vegan or paleo-friendly, be sure to stop at the Organic Market.

History of Mashpee Commons

While a shopping center has existed in the area since the 1960s, Mashpee Commons as it is known today has its roots in the mid-80s.
Before developers Douglas Storrs and Arnold Chace began developing a vision for the land in 1986, the existing infrastructure resembled a worn out and under-patronized strip mall.

The developers believed that in order to succeed and create a formal center of town, the shopping center should feature architecture inspired by traditional New England structures and be highly walkable.

They felt a mixed-use model would lend itself to a stronger economic community than a typical sprawling mall. The town-center feel which the Commons remains noted for was achieved by placing parallel parking spots in the busier intersections, creating a buffer between the road and sidewalk and therefore making these areas even more walkable.

In 1962, the former New Seabury mall area was comprised only a few shops. But as the community grew and diversified, so too did its merchants, a trend which continues today.

By CapeCod.com Staff 

Study Shows Sotheby's International Realty Ranks Highest In Trust Among Residential Real Estate Brokerage Brands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

Lifestory Research is pleased to announce the results of the 2017 America's Most Trusted@ Residential Real Estate Brokerage Study in which Sotheby's International Realty ranks highest in trust among residential real estate brokerage brands. Sotheby's  International Realty is a luxury real estate brand founded in 1976 by the Sotheby's Auction House. Sotheby's International Realty operates as a franchise focusing on brokering and marketing of luxury residential real estate. The study, based on 6,299 consumer surveys, tracks how trust impacts the evaluations of residential real estate brokerage brands by home shoppers. Consumer opinions are collected over the course of the prior 12 months throughout the United States. To qualify to participate in the study, participants must have indicated that they were aware of specific brands and actively shopping for a new home. Lifestory Research tracks the largest residential real estate brokerage brands in this ongoing study.The brands included in the ranking list are based upon those brands most recognized by consumers.Some brands included in the study are not represented in the list since they did not generate a brand awareness score high enough to be included.

Trust is measured through the Lifestory Research Net Trust Quotient Score in which each brand is evaluated in regards to trust by those shopping for a new home. An index score of 100 is average for all brands included in the study.

America's Most Trusted@, in its fifth year, is a designation awarded to brands that garner the trust among those they serve. Awards are based upon the collection and evaluation of thousands of consumer opinions. Product categories included in the 2017 research program include: home builders, active adult resort home builders, faucets, HVAC systems, kitchen appliance brands, laundry appliance brands, paint, and residential real estate brokerages. Trust is measured through a

Net Trust Quotient Score in which brands are divided into three categories: "advocates," customers who feel a significant trust toward the brand; "neutrals," those who trust a specific brand, but do not see a specific brand as standing on the shoulders of other brands, and "antagonists," who are skeptics with little, if any, trust in a specific brand.

Detailed information about the study can be found at: www.lifestoryresearch.com/most-trusted/ 

Real Estate Sales Show Signs of Strength on Cape Cod

January 11, 2017

HYANNIS –Barnstable County saw an increase in real estate sales volume and value in December 2016.

Real estate sales volume last month was up nearly 4 percent from December 2015 and the total value of sales was up 4.7 percent from the previous year.

“It was just indicative of what we’ve been doing all year and this month was not an exception from what we’ve been doing, and it was nice to see that trend we’ve been seeing over the last year continue,” said Barnstable County Register of Deeds Jack Meade.

Numbers also increased in the volume of mortgage activity with 16.8 percent from December 2015 levels.

The median individual property sale value last month also saw an increase of 1.8 percent from last year.

For 2016, the volume of sales was up 10.9 percent, total value of sales was up 13.4 percent, mortgage volume was up 12.6 percent and individual sales value was up 3 percent, compared to 2015.

Meade expects to see real estate sales dip in the first couple of months of 2017.

“We should see activity in March greater than what we have in January,” said Meade. “We will quiet for these three months and the question is how quiet.”

By JUSTIN SAUNDERS, CapeCod.com Newscenter

Ten dolphins rescued from Wellfleet Harbor on New Year's Day

By Steve Annear

GLOBE STAFF  JANUARY 02, 2017

It took a lot of heavy lifting, three transport vehicles, and a few mugs of hot cocoa from a nearby resident to keep warm and motivated. But after many hours of coordinated efforts, dozens of volunteers and staff from the International Fund for Animal Welfare rescued 10 Risso’s dolphins that had become stranded in Wellfleet Harbor on New Year’s Day.

Kerry Branon, a spokeswoman for the nonprofit animal welfare group, said calls from residents that three dolphins were swimming in the harbor first came in around 8 a.m. By the time crews arrived a few hours later, they determined that there was a total of 10 Risso’s in the area. She said the dolphins may have come close to shore while trying to capture prey.

Three of the same dolphins restranded in Truro on Monday, before being rescued and later released at Herring Cove in Provincetown.

On Sunday, rescuers at first spent several hours trying to herd the dolphins toward the open seas using two boats, said Branon. But as the tide went out, the stubborn marine animals became stuck in a part of the harbor called Chipman’s Cove. “So we went with plan B,” Branon said. “And it was all hands on deck.” Rescue teams braved cold and biting winds as they trudged through the thick mud in the harbor to safely move the dolphins, one-by-one. The marine animals were placed on stretchers, and then wheeled using special carts to the three nearby transport trucks — a flatbed that could fit two of the dolphins, and two enclosed vehicles that could each hold four of the marine animals.

Crews were familiar with the territory. In September, the group rescued 16 Atlantic white-sided dolphins that had stranded in a cove near Chequessett Neck Road.

Risso’s, which are protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act, are not an endangered species, according to the National Marine Fisheries Service. They are sometimes called “gray dolphins” because of their light coloration, and can weigh 660 to 1,100 pounds, according to the federal agency.Branon said it took 15 people to move from the mud flats to the vehicles some of the larger dolphins. “They are pretty big, and really quite heavy,” she said, adding that this was the largest stranding of Risso’s the nonprofit has ever responded to. “It’s a massive undertaking, 10 dolphins.”

Once the Risso’s were placed inside the transport vehicles, they were driven to Corn Hill Beach in nearby Truro. The dolphins were taken there after the group determined the favorable winds and tides would help the animals make it back out to sea. Branon said staff and volunteers from the group, as well as curious residents who happened upon the scene and local police all contributed to the successful rescue mission.

“It was an amazing team effort over many, many hours on a blustery, cold winter day,” she said. “Everyone was doing everything they could to save those dolphins. . . . I even saw a guy on the side of the road in Wellfleet, and he was standing there with a tray of hot cocoa. He had fresh mugs of cocoa that he made for everyone.”

  

         

 

Yellow-nosed Albatross Makes Rare Appearance on Cape Cod

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By   OCT 19, 2016

Already one of the great seabird watching locations in the world, Cape Cod recently produced yet another staggering record. Following last weekend’s storm, a Yellow-nosed Albatross was spotted doing what albatrosses do, casually gliding around in the wicked winds off First Encounter Beach in Eastham.

First Encounter has long been known in the birding world as the place to be following the passage of a Nor’easter, and the legendary location came through again.

During a Nor’easter, seabirds that would normally be well offshore get blown into Cape Cod Bay, where they wait for the right conditions to exit the bay and head back out to sea. During the easterly blow, the north facing beach at Sandy Neck in Barnstable is a good place to see these birds as they struggle to fly into the strong headwinds. But when the storm has passed and the winds shift to the northwest, the west-facing First Encounter offers the best chance to see birds typically difficult or impossible to see from land in this part of the world, and often right off the beach. Everything from puffins to rare Caribbean petrels have passed this beach over the years. And this is the second Yellow-nosed Albatross for First Encounter, the last one recorded in 2003. Local sea birding legend Blair Nikula is responsible for both of these records

Albatrosses hold a special place in the hearts of local birders, because of their rarity in the North Atlantic, which has no regularly occurring albatross species, and also because of their general impressiveness as animals. They are way bigger than other seabirds, sporting the longest wing spans of any living bird. The Wandering Albatross would have given a pterodactyl a fright, with wings spanning almost 12 feet. And albatrosses use these wings to great effect, gliding effortlessly for days at a time as they cover huge areas of ocean. One satellite tracked Wandering Albatross traveled over 3000 miles of ocean in 12 days, and others commute 2000 miles a week between their nests and feeding areas when raising their young.

From wing span to life span, these birds present a veritable cornucopia of natural history extremes. A Laysan Albatross named Wisdom was banded on Midway Atoll in the Pacific Ocean in 1956, when she was at least 5 years old. This almost septuagenarian is still alive and nesting on Midway today, having dodged threats like long-line fisheries and plastic ingestion that currently threaten albatross populations worldwide. Albatrosses feed on squid, fish, and crustaceans on the ocean surface, often at night, when they ingest the plastic trash that has collected in certain areas of the oceans, which they then feed to their chicks. Now iconic photos of the plastic-filled remains of the many dead albatross chicks on Midway have acutely illustrated the problem of plastic in our oceans.

Here in New England, we are just happy to see the very occasional albatross visiting from the southern hemisphere oceans they normally haunt. History tells us you are not likely to find one, and even when they do turn up, they are not seen again. Given the ground they can cover, this bird could be halfway to Europe by now. But even the slimmest chance of seeing one of these most impressive animals should be enough to draw you out to your local sea watching spot, because it may be a decade before we see another.

This article was taken from Cape & Island

Barnstable County Real Estate Sales Volume & Value Rise in September

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BARNSTABLE – Real estate sales and value were up last month in Barnstable County, compared to September 2015 numbers.

That’s according to Barnstable County Register of Deeds Jack Meade, who reports that sales were up 6% and value up 12.1% from last year.

The median individual property sale value was up 2% from September 2015 and there was a 32% increase in the volume of mortgage activity.

“With the median price being up, we’ve had a little more activity in the higher end, which we haven’t had for a while, this year has mostly focused on the lower end of the market but we’ve had some strong sales at the high end,” said Meade.

So far this year, the volume of sales is up 12.4%, total value of sales is up 14.8% and mortgage volume is up 8%.

Meade added that individual sales value is up 1.9 percent this year.

“That’s been kind of consistent with what we’ve been doing the last few years, we’ve been seeing two, maybe three percent increase in individual sales value, so slow but steady,” said Meade.

The median sales value last month was $350,000, matching June’s numbers.

By JUSTIN SAUNDERS, CapeCod.com Newscenter

October, A Beautiful Time To Visit Cape Cod

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October has become one of best months to visit Cape Cod. The weather is pleasant, the air crisp and there are fewer crowds than the busy summer season. The vibrant red cranberry bogs are being harvested as Cape Codders adorn the landscape with pumpkins, gourds, and colorful mums.

Autumn rates are lower for lodging and rentals and there is still plenty of things to do. Visit a farmer's market, arts and craft fair or the well known annual Wellfleet Oyster Festival.  Wellfleet's shellfishing history is deep rooted and its waters produce some the world's best oysters. This year the town celebrates their oyster bounty on October 15th & 16th. Wellfleet’s town center comes alive for this two-day family festival that brings together locals and visitors for a weekend of food, art, music, fun and games.

October is the perfect time of year to walk along the beach, enjoy a meal at one of the Cape's many restaurants, do some shopping in a charming Cape Cod town or stroll through the Mashpee Commons and discover its fine shops and restaurants. The beauty that surrounds Cape Cod in Autumn is magical and a wonderful time of year to explore the area and enjoy all its glory. 

Cape Cod Cranberry Bog

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